Soliloquy of the spanish cloister analysis

Water your damned flower-pots, do! Oh, that rose has prior claims — Needs its leaden vase filled brimming? Hell dry you up with its flames! At the meal we sit together; Salve tibi!

Soliloquy of the spanish cloister analysis

Ossa Certified Educator The Solliloquy is one of my absolutely personal favorite poems not as much a "dramatic monologue" thought it could be considered that since that is Browning's style.

I would just stick to it being considered a solliloquy whose main idea is to stream the inner thoughts of the main character and the depiction or focus on one other character as a result of the main character's analysis. In this totally hillarious solo, we have two The Solliloquy is one of my absolutely personal favorite poems not as much a "dramatic monologue" thought it could be considered that since that is Browning's style.

In this totally hillarious solo, we have two monks: According to our main character's rant, Brother Lawrence is basically a hypocrite and a manwhore who eats too much and indulges in just about everything.

The premise of the whole thing is that the narrator is indeed pointing one finger at poor brother Lawrence while the other three fingers point at himself.

The fact that he details brother Lawrence's lechery, lust, and gluttory makes you wonder why in the world a righteous man would just let it go, PLUS why would he stand and watch.

That is because the narrator is also involved in these treacheries of the church but, apparently, brother Lawrence has gotten a thicker fare from his doings and enjoys them more.

From the SparkNotes Blog

Hence, our narrator is jealous. Remember that Browning wrote this solliloquy during the most prudish of Victorian periods where religious fanaticism took the place of the inner sanctum of debauchery taking place in the Church, State, and even homes of those who claimed to practice it.

This is a clear rebel yell against religious institutions and it takes a clear dig at what Victorians considered moral and righteous.I. Gr-r-r-there go, my heart's abhorrence! Water your damned flower-pots, do! If hate killed men, Brother Lawrence, God's blood, would not mine kill you!

What? your myrtle-bush wants trimming? A summary of “Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister” in Robert Browning's Robert Browning’s Poetry.

Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister Analysis - attheheels.com

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The peculiar essence of the poem "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" written by Robert Browning lies in the impression of violent and disordered hatred. This feeling is revealed by the very structure of the work.

Soliloquy of the spanish cloister analysis

The poem "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" is written in nine stanzas and is narrated by an unnamed Spanish monk who watches in hatred and envy as Brother Lawrence waters plants.

The entire poem is spoken by the monk to himself. Robert Browning’s “Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister” is, as the title suggests, the soliloquy of an unnamed monk, complaining to himself against Brother Laurence, another monk whom he has to be cloistered with in the monastery.

Poem of the Week: Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister by Robert Browning | Books | The Guardian